Quantcast

Get Involved!

Make yourself known:

Why I Love… Articles Retrobate Profile Retro Game Profiles

Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fathers

2,525 views 0 comments

Released: 1994

Genre: Adventure

Format reviewed: PC - DOS

Publisher: Sierra

Developer: Sierra

Submitted by: Scott Reed

I'm a big fan of the website Hardcore Gaming 101, which you should Google if you don't already visit it. If you do visit you'll know he's been updating with a lot of old Sierra adventure games. Most of which are to my mind, barely worth the bandwidth. The exception – the Gabriel Knight series.

What I like so much about Gabriel Knight, which in turn is what could put the most people off, is it has much more in common with a detective novel. And detective novel's progression and style don’t have much in common with action films, and even less in common with video games. You don't leave New Orleans for the first 7 levels (Days) and nothing really happens until you do. There's no action, no cackling bad guys just a great story for you to uncover gradually. This kept me playing because I love great stories and everything was divided up well enough for there still to feel like progression. If that whole paragraph puts you off the game, don’t worry.

The story and the lack of moon logic when it comes to puzzles are what makes Sins of the Fathers so great. I'm not a superficial person. Gameplay uber alles. Sod that, the game looks gorgeous. I can't think of a single other adventure game that looks this nice. If adventure game graphics were food this would be chocolate. Sins still falls into a few Adventure game traps now and again, though it’s hard to die and most of the puzzles don’t require you being the person who designed it. But it looks so nice, it actually covers this up!

Sins of the Father is an adventure game through and through. If you're expecting anything like platforming or RPG elements or anything silly like that then you'll be disappointed. It even has MORE icons to click on. Some may call this overcomplicated, but I call it handy. Mostly due to the two 'talk' icons, meaning if I want to a character to remind me who the hell they were I don’t get an unskippable soliloquy