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Radiant Silvergun

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Released: 1998

Genre: Shoot-’em-up

Format reviewed: Sega Saturn

Publisher: ESP

Developer: Treasure

Submitted by: David McMahon

I thought this ultimate classic would have been done by someone by now but sadly I couldn't find it so here's mines.

As you well know it's a scrolling shoot em up and to date probably the best and sadly it's system (the Sega Saturn) is no longer around for us to enjoy more often. Unless you have a few hundred quid to buy just the game on ebay and another few quid for a Japanese or chipped Saturn.

I remember a mate from years ago bought the Official Saturn Magazine and they were doing a preview on the game and the following weekend we went to a games shop called CA Games in Glasgow's Westend and they were selling a actual copy of the game for £60. Whoever was working on that article didn't do a great investigation.

The game itself has got addiction all over it. What a challenge I found it to complete and with the price to buy second hand today hanging around £100. What a bargain it was 10 years previous.

I read that there's a Nintendo DS version coming out. If it's true I hope my opinion is the same.

Also does anyone know why CA Games closed? That place was never quiet. 

Radiant Silvergun

2,621 views 0 comments

Released: 1998

Genre: Shoot-’em-up

Format reviewed: Arcade

Publisher: ESP

Developer: Treasure

Submitted by: Darran Jones

Thanks to the internet most gamers have now heard of Treasure’s sublime Radiant Silvergun, but not many have had the pleasure of actually playing it (unless of course you’re a staunch defender of the likes of MAME).

First released in Japanese arcades back in 1998, Radiant instantly set itself apart from its peers thanks to its superlative aesthetics, constant innovative bosses and an intriguing (if rather messy) combo system that enabled you to power up your weapons by constantly shooting down enemies.

Then, of course, there’s the fact that you’d immediately start play with seven very distinct weapons (unlike other shooters of the time, there are no power-ups to collect). Ranging from standard forward fire to a devastating sword that could cut through the metal hull of ships like a hot knife through butter, each armament had to be used to the max in order to make progress through the exceedingly tough stages.

Essentially lengthy boss rushes, a level of Radiant Silvergun would leave you bruised, battered, yet exhilarated and desperately eager for more. Despite its insane toughness (you’re not going to be one-crediting this baby in a hurry) you’d constantly want to carry on playing, if only so you could see what imaginative boss Treasure had thought up next.Often huge in size and with over-the-top weaponry to match, each massive boss was a beautiful mechanical monstrosity that would first invoke fear as you gazed upon its immense girth, and then satisfaction as you systematically started destroying key parts of it. Treasure used every trick in the book (and no doubt a few that weren’t) to ensure that each and every battle with those memorable bosses stayed in the back of your mind forever, and even today Silvergun’s behemoths feel refreshingly new.

Ported to the Saturn just a few months after its arcade release, Silvergun remains one of the machine’s best (and priciest) shooters and proved that when it comes to this underappreciated genre, no one quite makes them like Treasure.